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THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL

when rights go wrong The out of home media business in Johannesburg was regarded as the ‘wild west’ for some years, with regular reports of kickbacks, backhanders and outright bribes to secure advertising sites. Since taking over management of the City, the Democratic Alliance has been intent on cleaning it up. By MARCIA KLEIN. The City of Johannesburg’s attempts to clean up illegal outdoor advertising are essentially in limbo, as the City and advertisers wait for protracted legal processes on the imposition of bylaws, which have declared certain sites illegal, to unfold. The City is hamstrung by having to start a legal process with each non-compliant advertiser individually, said Andrew Stewart, strategic advisor in the office of the member of the mayoral committee in the department of economic development at the City. The out of home media business in Johannesburg was regarded as the ‘wild west’ for some years, with regular reports of kickbacks, backhanders and outright bribes to secure advertising sites. Since taking over management of the City, the Democratic Alliance has been intent on cleaning it up. Mayor Herman Mashaba’s Operation Buya Mthetho, which enforces bylaws, extends to illegal outdoor advertising to ensure that media owners act responsibly and that companies booking space on advertising signs ensure the signs have been approved by the City. The City is also pushing for new players to secure entry into the OOH space. The stakes are high, as OOH advertising revenue continues to grow, especially in emerging markets. PwC’s African Entertainment and Media Outlook: 2017 – 2021 report shows that South Africa is the largest OOH market in Africa, valued at R4.4 billion in 2016 and forecast to grow at a compound annual rate of 2.7% over the next five years. Digital out of home advertising is driving overall OOH advertising growth globally at a compound annual growth rate of 16.2%, it revealed, and over a quarter of South Africa’s OOH revenue now comes from DOOH formats. “This proportion is set to rise to over 40% by 2021 as DOOH becomes ever more prominent in South Africa, generating revenue of R2 billion,” PwC said. It added, however, that regulation remains a difficulty in South Africa, and that recent government efforts to crack down on illegal and unlicensed OOH advertising have been a positive development. While this is being managed relatively effectively in some cities, things have proven more difficult in Johannesburg, where the City has been met with a prolonged legal battle with major outdoor player ADreach about the legality of outdoor sites, a fight P 24 The Media | wagthedog.co.za


THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL
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