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THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL

OOH in joburg that has been going since early 2017 and remains unresolved. This has seriously hampered the City’s ability to act and has caused some bad feelings between some industry players and the City. ADreach and the City entered into a joint venture in 2002 on street light advertising. In March this year, the City sent ADreach a final letter of demand to remove all advertising from street poles across Johannesburg, saying the Joburg Property Company had issued a notice of termination of its memorandum of agreement with ADreach in February 2017, which ADreach had ignored. Jack Sekgobela, operations manager for outdoor advertising development planning at the City, told The Media Online that the process of cleaning up the industry and dealing with illegal billboards and other advertising has been slow, “as we still have to take transgressors to court. “There is a court matter to deal with which prevents us from removing illegal signs before going to court.” Stewart said ADreach’s “adopt a light” campaign was an add-on to a contract which expired and ADreach was aware from the outset that it had a fixed term contract which was not ever green in nature. ADreach CEO Brad Fisher said the case revolves around “whether the city made a commitment to us when it was run by a different dispensation (the ANC), or does the current dispensation have the right to cancel what we believe will prove was a clear cut commitment. “Linked to that is our determination to prove to the City and authorities that our contract and arrangement is a partnership with the City that has a community commitment aspect which they refuse to honour, and we have now reported this to higher authorities (Treasury) to force them to give a full account of the now close to R140 million that we have paid them for community development.” Fisher said ADreach agreed in principle with the three major areas the City was trying to tackle, but believed it was “making certain exceptions for certain companies” and singling out ADreach, which was “one of the very few that committed in black and white to complying with all the City’s goals”. He said one of the goals is to remove illegal sites or get money for those, which are not offensive. “On that point, every one of our signs was submitted to the City, which is sitting with a list and approved each site.” ADreach also cut down to one third of its footprint, and it agreed with the need for industry transformation and levelling of the playing field. “In this case, not only did ADreach far exceed what we regard as compliance”, but also developed a platform where small billboard companies could collectively get to critical mass and compete with big companies. It also got a scheme approved to link the micro supplier network to big companies so they could invest in them. It also agreed with the City’s need for revenue enhancement and measures for it to participate in the upside, but there were some OOH players that didn’t even pay for their sites. He said that in terms of a new bylaw, the City can just decide to remove a sign that Mayor Herman Mashaba’s Operation Buya Mthetho, which enforces bylaws, ensures that media owners act responsibly The Media | wagthedog.co.za P 25


THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL
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