Page 28

THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL

OOH IN Joburg it suddenly regards as illegal in its view, irrespective of whether it was legal in the first place. One example of the industry’s frustration, is OOH advertising rights for OR Tambo airport, which have been in limbo for about four years. They were due to be overhauled in 2014, and a tender was issued, but nothing has happened since, with allegations of internal fraud and corruption. OR Tambo did not respond to requests for an interview. An industry player who did not wish to be named, said billboards account for 50% of the industry, with the rest made up of transit media such as buses, taxi ranks, train stations, airports and malls, and some smaller niche opportunities in places like golf courses and washrooms. The DA’s bylaws have been challenged and the process is essentially in limbo, he said. “The City is trapped in litigation with certain media owners, so at face value, nothing has changed on the ground and no illegal billboards have been removed.” He said Tshwane’s OOH was well managed, bylaws were enforced, there was little or no illegal signage and there is a well-administrated department at the municipality. In Johannesburg, this is not the case and the “mess is largely historic”. While Durban has been good in terms of enforcing bylaws, there are also cases under litigation, while Cape Town is strict on enforcement. He said there are still a number of “rogue players” in the industry, and non-submission of applications is widespread. “There is definitely an attitude that if everyone else does it, I will too, and there are players that are specialists in litigation. P 26 The Media | wagthedog.co.za


THE MEDIA NOV_2018 - TMOL
To see the actual publication please follow the link above