Page 14

THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital

12 WEST Africa Nigeria – Resilient with a (mostly) good story to tell Nigeria has about 135 With 36 states and an internet savvy population of nearly 200 million people, Nigeria’s media scene continues to thrive despite challenges. radio stations (many state-owned), over 200 TV stations (nearly 23 million people own TV sets and 96% of the population watch TV) and a print penetration of 37% with over 85 newspapers and 70 plus magazines. But like the rest of the media world, Nigeria too is suffering from dwindling revenues in some sectors (especially print), growth in others (particularly digital and out of home media) and massive fragmentation (due to digital disruption). Michael Umogun, head of business development at Millward Brown in Nigeria, says most newspapers, whether stateowned or in the hands of private companies, are struggling, “Neither have a good story to tell,” he says. “Some, like The Punch, The Guardian, The Nation, Daily Trust and Business Day are doing okay but not well enough. In a country of nearly 200 million people, they should be doing a lot better.” He adds that most newspapers are “government aligned”, as well as government-owned. There’s a strong belief that being associated with the state is good for business. Umogun believes revenue is going to online and into out of home. Newspapers without a mobile offering will suffer even more in a country with a youthful population that’s “internet savvy”. Out of home media is a winner, not least due to not being impacted by an erratic power supply. “The landscape of Lagos is changing through out of home,” says Umogun. Prior to by-laws regulating OOH (each of the 36 states has its own regulations), and the creation of the Lagos State Signage and Advertising Agency (LASAA) the city was a “mess”. But now, Umogun says, “There’s much innovation happening and there are huge billboards in public spaces”. He’s unwilling to put a number on the revenue generated by the out of home sector in Lagos, but a recent survey by Ideas House Consultancy with LASAA put it at 50-billion Naira per annum and reckoned it had created over 100 000 jobs. TV’s top players Nigeria was the first country in Africa to broadcast television in 1959 – South Africa only got TV in 1976. The Nigerian Television Authority (NTA) is present in all 36 states, and has seven network centres in each geo-political zone, with around 96 TV stations. The state also owns LTV, Delta Broadcasting Service, OGTV, AKBC and ABS. Interestingly, of the 96% of the population who watch TV, 53% subscribe to South Africa’s satellite offering DStv Compact. “The television media space is dominated by free-to-air (FTA) brands like NTA, AIT and Silverbird that run syndicated channel arrangements, while Channels TV, TV Continental (recently re- “The future for digital is promising. We have a young population and their access to media/ info is predominantly via digital means/ platforms.” – Tolu Onile-Ere THEMEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL 2016


THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital
To see the actual publication please follow the link above