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THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital

Ampofo says that new media was starting to feature in Ghana, but that traditional media – particularly radio – still plays a huge role. Radio penetration is 91%. “Everybody listens to the radio whether they’re driving into work with their car radios on, listening in their corner shops or walking in the street with a hand-held radio set. It’s a ubiquitous medium that will always remain relevant in the Ghanaian market,” he said. FM radio only started in 1988, leading to foreign stations such as Voice of America, BBC and Radio France Internationale entering the broadcast arena. But it was only in 1995, after a major demonstration by the public, that government finally issued FM frequencies for privately held stations. The PAMRO 2015 Country Report, coming off a base of 3.2 million listeners, lists Hello (20%) as the biggest station in terms of reach, followed by Peace FM (18%), Angel (18%), Kessben Radio (16%), Adom (15%), Fox (15%), Metro FM (14%), Ash FM (13%), Nhyira (13%) and Sky (12%). The state-owned and run Ghana Broadcasting Corporation (GBC) was launched in 1935, as the then Gold Coast Broadcasting System (renamed in 1957 with the country’s independence from Britain). Television launched in 1965 and TV penetration today is at 92%. Apart from the GBC, there are several private networks such as TV3, Metro TV, Viasat 1, TV Skyy and TV Africa as well as global operators such as the BBC and CNN. The PAMRO Country Report of 2015 reports that the relatively new United Television Ghana has the most reach, followed by TV3, GTV, Viasat 1, Metro, Crystal Xtra, GH One, TV Africa Net 2, and E TV. Measurability of television audiences was difficult until recently. Ampofo adds, “For years the network couldn’t tell me who was watching. But as soon as I put the programme on my website, the internet service provider was automatically able to count and locate people following the show. So, the introduction of new media into the market is allowing for some sort of measurability. For traditional advertising campaigns that use print, radio or television, however, it is still quite difficult to correctly understand the extent to which they are effective,” said Ampofo. n Ghana FAST FACTS Population: 26,327,649, Urban: 54% of population Age structure: 0-14 years: 38.38%, 15-24 years: 18.69%, 25-54 years: 33.95%, 55-64 years: 4.84%, 65 years and over: 4.14% Ethnic groups: Akan: 47.5%; Mole - Dagbon: 16.6%; Ewe: 13.9%; Ga-Dangme: 7.4%; Gurma: 5.7%; Guan: 3.7%; Grusi: 2.5% Mande- Busanga: 1.1%, other tribes: 1.6% Languages: Asante: 14.8%, Ewe:12.7%, Fante: 9.9%; Boron: 4.6%; Dagomba: 4.3%; Dangme: 4.3%; Dagarte (Dagaba): 3.7%; Akyem: 3.4%, Ga: 3.4%, Akuapem: 2.9%; Others (includes English - official): 36.1% Literacy: 76.60% Income: Share of income of highest 10%: 44.7%; Under poverty line: 40.5% Internet users: 5.18 million Internet 20% penetration: Mobile users: 30.4 million (2014) Source OMG Africa June 2016 “Everybody listens to the radio whether they’re driving into work with their car radios on, listening in their corner shops or walking in the street with a hand-held radio set.” – David Ampofo 20 WEST Africa THEMEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL 2016


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