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THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital

22 EAST Africa Kenya – Emerging through the storms The Kenyan media landscape has become dynamic and diverse thanks to forward-thinking government Tpolicies and accomplishments in the mobile sphere. he United Nations’ World Population Prospects estimated the 2015 population of Kenya to be about 46 050 000. More than 80% of the population is under 40; only 25% of the population is urbanised. Adult illiteracy is low at about 27%; the sub-Saharan Africa average is 38%. Whilst the Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology has identified 53 distinct community languages, there are two official languages - Kiswahili and English. The Kenyan Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) provisional GDP estimate for First Quarter 2016, is 5.9%, up from 5.0% in Q1 2015. The Ernst & Young Africa Attractiveness Index 2016 ranked the country fourth, after South Africa, Morocco and Egypt. It is little wonder that Kenya serves as a hub for the East African marketing and advertising industry. Barack Obama described Kenya as a “country on the move”, and it has certainly moved swiftly to become one of Africa’s tech leaders. A forward thinking government Information and Communications Technology (ICT) policy encouraged the development of ICT infrastructure. Print is challenging Print remains under pressure unsurprisingly in a country of mobile-attached youngsters. There are 6 dailies, 7 weeklies, scores of regional newspapers, and more than 25 magazines, but daily reach of print is 8%. The largest circulating newspapers are Sunday Nation, Daily Nation, Standard, Star and People. In its 2015 Annual Report, The Standard Group acknowledged the problem of declining circulation, which it is attempting to tackle via “creative selling”, revamping and redesigning. A print success story is the Nairobian, launched in 2013. The newspaper runs a column, The Nairobian Defender, dealing with unresolved public complaints. It has attracted new readers and increased circulation to over 100 000! TV teritory Unfortunately, Kenya’s migration to Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) was fraught with problems. The most problematic issue, however, was the Communications Authority’s (CA) decision to issue only two broadcast signal distributor licences. The intention was to allow broadcasters to share transmitters and “develop content and not invest in expensive infrastructure”. THEMEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL 2016 See page 24 n


THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital
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