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THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital

38 Southern Africa Zambia – Tapping into the power of digital Zambia boasts a wide range of readily accessible and relatively affordable information sources. Despite a low economic status that has nevertheless shown strong growth in recent years thanks to an international demand for copper, Zambia’s media landscape offers a diversity of media platforms. However, the country has one government-owned national news agency, Zambia News and Information Services (ZANIS) and media freedom is largely restricted. According to the African Media Barometer Zambia 2013 report, government provides financial support to public media institutions (Daily Mail, Times of Zambia, and ZNBC), and advertises on these platforms – but is selective with its advertising in the private media, “depending on the level of criticism of government by individual media houses”. Radio is the strongest broadcast medium in the country, with 45 stations reaching 75% of Zambia’s population of about 16 million. Its reach is decent but fragmented. The state-run broadcaster ZNBC has three radio stations: ZNBC 1 (multilingual and most popular), ZNBC 2 (English), and ZNBC 4 (English) all grabbing the top listenership spots in the country. Community and religious stations are also highly popular, while independent regional offerings such as Radio Breeze in Chipata (English and Nyanja) and QFM (English), Hot FM and Komboni Radio (a mix of English and dialects) in Lusaka rank high in listenership. International broadcasters such as BBC and Radio France International are accessible in Lusaka and Kitwe. As with radio, television stations have grown significantly in Zambia over the past five years to 15 stations. About 69% of Zambian households own a television set, with most tuning into the national broadcaster ZNBC, which broadcasts on two channels as ZNBC 1 and ZNBC 2. Muvi TV, DStv and GoTV – all of which require decoders – are the most popular commercial programme providers. However, television content is limited and generally of poor quality. The lack of dependable electricity also makes television an unreliable option. With an estimated 61% literacy rate the print industry is relatively small, with newspapers dominating. THEMEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL 2016


THE MEDIA AFRICA ANNUAL_digital
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